Unity or UDK or CryEngine or...?

Discussion in 'Discussion' started by Not_Sure, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. sereda008

    sereda008

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    I have worked with Unity, UDK and the Cryengine 3, and to be honest, they both have their strengths.

    Unity: More suitable for small indie games, as they are much easier and faster to create than on other engines.
    UDK: The big gun. Very unfriendly (as I found it) and very static, but if you don't care for dynamic environments or the pain of developing in it, then it is for you.
    Cryengine 3: Might not contain as many development features as UDK, but is much easier and is 100% dynamic. This is the best engine in my opinion if you want to create games which are anywhere more than 2 week indie games. much friendlier than UDK, but there are not that many resources around, and many are outdated. Does not support Iphone/android/web games.

    For a large game I am creating, I choice Cryengine 3. It is by far the best engine in my opinion. But if you are looking to create a small game in a few weeks which is designed to reach a large audience, I would suggest Unity. I myself am using Unity to create a small project, simply because it will be faster and playable on web browsers.
     
  2. koyima

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    This looks like you are talking about shooters, FPS in general, modifying weapons,characters and assets to act according to your liking - although with tremendus freedom, from what I understand - is closer to modding.

    I read the DungeonDefense blog and they are also basically modifying existing stuff. It looks like a higher level of control. For instance: let's tell the characters to use the navmesh system, now let's add split screen, tap tap done, all using UDK provided framework.

    This is both a blessing and a problem. It's a blessing, because you are using pre-made tested systems and basically wiring up the setup (and I'm guessing this is what you mean by how UDK dev should be done). These systems are working, they do what you want and you can alter them to an extent.

    The problem is: the same, you are working with pre-made systems. How Epic did it, what they wanted to do, you have to follow their logic and understand their way of doing things. Basically you have to follow Epic and essentially work with their engine, not build it.

    These are examples similar to the ones you described and from what I see most of the blog goes on like that, basically cleverly modifying stuff to serve the intended purpose. This is not bad, but in order to be able to do things in this way an in-depth knowledge of UDKs systems is a must. You have to experiment with stuff, you have to remember what "looked like it could do this too", it's not very "pro" in my opinion to rely on this as a general purpose game creation environment.

    Why would I modify a projectile to support variable width in order to get a magic wand effect? Do I have to compare all my features to their analog in the UDK world (a Pulse Gun for instance here from what I gather)?

    On the other hand Unity requires a lot more systems to be created by the dev (or bought - that's why there is an Asset store), this is bad for people who expect systems up and running and that's why Dastardly Banana's fps constructor is popular for example. You can then modify stuff and come up with your own version or write your own to support what you specifically need. This is bad if what you are seeking for is a base for an FPS for example.

    For other developers, working freelance for clients or making small games, this is ideal, because they can make their game and build only what they need, don't need to worry about "tricking" the engine into behaving how they want it to behave and only code the functionality they need.

    Unreal is a de facto industry standard, that is the main reason it is so popular. You can get a job if you know how to use it, cos an exec doesn't care how you come up with results, but he is interested in the FACT that other companies finish games with this engine all the time, so you should too. It's simple: why gamble? Asking the devs - up until recently - would also lead to: Unreal. Cos they also see the value of past experience, even if they have to do everything as an Unreal mod, at least they got a ton of stuff to stop worrying about (Speed Tree implemented, FaceFX implemented, Beast etc etc). Why care if you have to do some "magic" to actually get to the desired result, instead of straight up coding exactly what you want, you have AAA written all over you and a good chunk of work done.

    You can see this at work with other engines, MMO ones for example. If EA did it so an we, so let's use this "sure bet" engine. It's a wise choice and that's why they don't use UDK for their MMO. It doesn't mean UDK is bad for MMOs (I think Lineage was Unreal), but why gamble, instead buy a tool with a prooven track record or specific features useful for the task at hand.

    Unity is more multipurpose and Unreal, to me, basically seems like: investing too much time for limited freedom in the end.

    I also doubt skills in using Unreal in such a manner are really transferable to another engine (one in which it is required to write the weapon system or the weapon system is different etc), inherently then you prefer Unreal to stay the de facto standard.

    Now why would UDK seem akward and strange to a Unity dev:

    A person having used Unity, will not try to modify Unreal systems to fit his needs, but will try straight away to script exactly what he needs, when he sees this takes time, he will give up. He has no prior knowledge as to which asset to modify in order to get the result he wants, he isn't even thinking that way to begin with. Basically he has to spend a year "discovering and understanding Unreal", to work in the fashion you describe, whereas in Unity he spends a year coding, from which he might get more satisfaction and results faster ( I do).
    Things are more to the point and you can reach to solutions on your own, with your own code.




    A little background:
    I too started out with UnrealEd (when it was just an Editor), my aspiration then was to make an FPS (wow), I started making buildings for the levels, then a character, put them in, shot around, but that was it: a level to play around in.

    So along comes Unity (PC) and after a while UDK. This was the beginning, I had already tested Unity, built levels added characters with animations, controllable as I wished and my friend says they launched UDK too, free to develop and stuff. We start it up, still using ActorX plug-ins, still had to conform to their setup (and I was using Biped developed by Epic), still had to have maya scale for characters, max scale for assets (they switched character pipelines) and I'm like: damn, woman why would I do all that if my game is cartoony and has no weapons or if I'm making a platformer or have to make puzzles, because the game is an action-adventure?

    I also use Zbrush and not mudbox...
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  3. koyima

    koyima

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    TL;DR: In order to work with UDK fast you need UDK system specific knowledge and working with it akes more to modding. In Unity you just need a goal and the docs, this is closer to actual development.

    Depending on your knowledge of each tech,one will seem ridiculous compared to the other (this goes both ways).

    If you know UDk inside and out, having to create systems from the ground up will seem as wasting time. Since you know what to modify, in order to avoid the coding/compiling routine, why not?

    If you use Unity a lot, forced to work with someone else's systems will look intrusive and requiring "magic" skills. Since you know how to code something, why modify something similar, it sounds un-optimized and not-clean.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  4. zalazingo

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    I provided an FPS example because thats the easiest one to make, as there's back end work about it. That doesn't mean however, its just applicable to FPS games. You can use the system I described to for an RTS game, you can make different units, on the fly, just from the editor. You can make an RPG game and use the same system for random encounters, I just used a weapon example because that one is the easiest to explain this system, with least amount of words.

    While Unreal is biased towards FPS and good amount of code is actually towards FPS (mainly, UTDemo they have), scripting isn't based on that. If you extend from base classes, there's NOTHING related to FPS games there. You can just build functionality as you go and stick the functions you wrote into the main loop. Not satisfied with unrealscript language? Write it in C++. I don't see that is "the unreal way" of doing things. At most they give you the ability to expose the variables to the editor (Crysis has something similar from what I hear) and rest is normal programming. You are encouraged to use already existing functionality, but you're not forced to.

    Looking at Unity reference, I don't see how it is that much different than unreal script. Its basically a stripped out to bare essentials API. You want to same thing in unrealscript? Throw out UTGame and UDKGame packages, and thats it. You get the the core API and can design whatever you need with both archetype and c++ support.

    The FPS codebase that causes so much dread is actually very specific. You can't even actually create an FPS other than an UT clone simply by modifying existing stuff. The specific quotes you mentioned actually talking about creating functionality. PostBeginPlay is a main game loop, akin to Unity' Update Order scheme (LateUpdate() I think). Weapon and Projectile that first quote mentioned are actually basic inventory classes. No where near advanced as the Dastardly Banana you mentioned. That looks a lot like the archetypes of Unreal (which, in unreal you have to create yourself).

    I don't really get this "In unreal you modify, in unity you create" thing, because both systems are very similar, except stuff like Dastardly Banana doesn't cost $75 in UDK. By the way, if you buy and use that, how is it not un-optimized and not-clean? Its other peoples code, ugh ;)
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  5. OmniverseProduct

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    Yes, that's right. That's how it was. Thanks. I probably won't switch to UDK. If I'm happy with Unity, I don't see a point in switching.
     
  6. zalazingo

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    That's one of the few valid reasoning I've seen on this thread. No, this isn't sarcasm.
     
  7. npsf3000

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    It might be just me but when somebody says:

    Use our propelling scripting language, or failing that, C++.

    I run away screaming in horror.
     
  8. myka

    myka

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    I honestly think that UDK is better because your dont have to pay for licences for any consoles :) (I dont get how Unity gets awy with charging for them) but Unity is MUCH easier to use (for me)cause I learned it first) but if you are serious about making a game for a console or one to sell without spending 15,000 bucks on an xbox 360 licence then go with UDK (Unless your are rich). UDK is a much stronger engine, but it is harder a less fun to use Video Game Engine :) Also look at all the Professional games that were made with UDK :

    Unreal Tournament, Deus Ex, Turok, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Vegas, America's Army, Red Steel, Gears of War, BioShock, BioShock 2, Star Wars Republic Commando, Tactical Ops: Assault on Terror, Borderlands, Destroy All Humans! Path of the Furon, Batman: Arkham Asylum, Section 8, Stranded, Splinter Cell, Killing Floor, Mass Effect (used elements of the Unreal Engine).

    Gears of War 1 and 2 and Unreal Tournament 3 are all made with Unreal Engine 3.

    Those are all really good games and there arent very many "pro" games out there made with Unity :(
     
  9. TylerPerry

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    You are very mistaken Myka.... UDK dose not even support consoles, you are thinking about Unreal engine that costs alot more then unity :D
     
  10. hippocoder

    hippocoder

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    You seem very sure so you must be right. You should use UDK.

    Joking aside, Unreal is lot more expensive, even UDK via royalties. With Unity, you take the hit up front and never pay again (unless you release one game every two years :p)
     
  11. zalazingo

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    Lets just take something out of context and scream how terrible it sounds on paper without any thoughts as to what it is, to make ourselves feel better and smarter!

    UDK doesn't have console support. It only has PC, Mac and IOS support. You need to make deals behind closed doors with Epic to even get Android license, let alone console version.

    It doesn't matter how many games an engine is used, what matters is your capability of doing something with it. Rage has the most technologically advanced engine right now, but that doesn't matter if you can't use it.
     
  12. npsf3000

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    Let's completely ignore a valid point and MAJOR consideration.

    C#/.Net is one of U3D's killer features, at least in my line of work. If I had to use C++ to implement basic functionality I'd lose so much of my capability it's not funny.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  13. keithsoulasa

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    I'd say the failure with Rage was gameplay, back to redbox( game rentals from an ATM like machine). Why word ID not give us an online deathmatch mode . WHY

    But Like Zala said, its not the engine, its the dev.
     
  14. OmniverseProduct

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    Not only that. but In my research I came to the conclusion that C++ is easy to learn but pretty hard to learn efficient coding skills. If you want to learn C++, you're better off learning other languages first. C#/.net doesn't seem to be that way.
     
  15. dogzerx2

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    UDK would be good to make one or two good games with it, try to get around 50k of profit but not much more, then forget about it and use unity to make the rest of your life profit!
     
  16. zalazingo

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    I answered the valid point multiple times on my posts already. No, you do not have to use C++ to implement basic functionality, its an option that you can choose to use.

    I'm not advocating UDK over Unity or Unity over UDK or anything. I'm simply stating the facts. You want to use Unity? Thats great. Why the mass baseless accusations against its competitor? :p

    I can understand things like "I like the workflow better, I like its UI, its spirit, asset pipeline, no royalties", instead this whole thread is "you can't do that, thats not possible, thats stupid" that is based on nothing but hearsay. I don't expect Unity devs to know UDK, but come on, don't fall to 8 year old logic guys :p

    P.S. I'm not trying to recruit anyone, you don't have to justify your choice.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
  17. actuallystarky

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    While the complete Unreal engine does indeed give you source-level control to modify 'native' classes with C++ with UDK you are pretty much stuck with Unrealscript. You can use C++ to pre-compile DLLs that you call with unrealscript but that's it.

    But Unrealscript is okay in any case. Once you get used to the sometimes funny syntax and start enjoying the built-in state machine it's pretty good.
     
  18. npsf3000

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    What baseless accusations?

    Unreal Script or C++ - both are sub-optimal IMO.

    That's my main complaint with UDK... and it's not baseless.
     
  19. redcap_old

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    I model with a zBrush/Blender workflow (Because blender is 100% cheaper than anything else) UDK struggles to no end to import FBXs created in Blender, whereas nothing else struggles to integrate with Blender. The armatures are so confusing, and it just doesn't work. So Unity wins in the ease of use with other software... That was totally not related to scripting, nor do others care I am sure; however, thought I would throw my hat into the ring of opinions.
     
  20. koyima

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    The Dungeon Defence blog wasn't talking about a FPS project, it's a tower defence game, he modified anything and everything in order to bend it to his will, you pointed it out as the way to work. You also explain how you would go about doing things in order to avoid the tiresome re-start editor routine, you even said that if you have to start scripting you are "hacking things" anyway in UDK.

    <- This is ridiculous, nearly every coder I know starts simple and then extends and re-factors and re-works, starting from "basically working", to "fully fledged modular extendable functionality" when writing code,it's rare for someone to write one huge page, which is final and then test.

    If your suggested way of working (with ease and speed) is modifying existing assets, why don't you accept the " in UDK you modify, in Unity you create". Are you suggesting that we should not use the speedy workflow in UDK? Are you suggesting that modifying isn't modifying?

    Basically you said that if you are not modifying existing code you are hacking stuff together and exposing archetype variables is the way to work in UDK, this is not the same as Unity at all.
    This is not how you do things in Unity,so where do you see the similarities? Maybe you haven't used UT and are biased? Generally all environments have their counterparts, so of course you can sort of do that here, but you wouldn't follow these steps to do something like this, because the logic is different.

    Working the same way you do in Unity requires scripting new stuff, not exposing variables and that is exactly why when someone tries to go from UT to UDK they say: f**k that! this will take forever. Essentially when you know how to code and you have access to a scripting language you expect to use that, not to try and find which variable you need to expose to hack your result by "exploiting" it.

    Now if you think I am biased I suggest you re-read your posts in which essentially you say people are biased because they don't know to use UDK "correctly", then you explain that the "correct" way is to expose variables and modify assets, classes etc, then you deny that this is modifying and in the end you aren't trying to convert anyone to using UDK .

    Of course you can work with what you like, I am not trying to convert you, you came here and started talking about how the community doesn't understand UDK cos they haven't worked with it.
    I have worked with it and compared to Unity it's a traditional game engine in the end, while Unity is more of a framework that provides, graphics, sound, physics and scripting, what you create with it is up to you. I am not making a game with it right now.
    This is neither good or bad, but we have to understand what we are talking about and if scripting in UDK is cumbersome that is lame and you should just accept it, not try to convince me that modifying isn't modifying and that people who don't like that style of work are biased.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2012
  21. janpec

    janpec

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    I would simplify it like that: In Unity you create then modify. In UDK you have created given and you modify. It is obvious that Unity procedure to coding is twice better and gives you much more freedom , i dont think there are any replys needed on that.
     
  22. koyima

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    Unity has control over it's workspace, you tried to extend it with 3rd party software mid-project. I have tried Antares Universe and I have to say that - as with probably every complex extension - you always start fresh, adding something with so much functionality mid-project is a no-no.
    They gave you control, you misused it and it's their fault? Well, as Macs have prooved, yes, yes it is.
     
  23. koyima

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    Yep.
     
  24. pyocote

    pyocote

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    I dont get what do you mean. Steeper learning curve means it is easier? or harder?

     
  25. Soldier321

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    It means it is harder, yea n unreal, if you want to implement something, you more or less got to know the engine almost inside out

    The good thing about learning unreal script though, almost guaranteed to land you in a AAA gaming company
     
  26. _Petroz

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    Citation needed.
     
  27. nipoco

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    It is not a guarantee, but UE is a widely used engine in the game industry. And that gives you better chances to find work at a triple A game production.
     
  28. theflamingskunk

    theflamingskunk

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    I do not understand why these threads exist. It is not even a question which engine is better. the better engine is hands down the engine that fits your needs. To sit around bickering why x is better than y is simply foolish. They are both very diffrent engines and are suited to diffrent development styles. Making wide generalizations based upon opinions does nothing to further either party.

    Anyways, I have used both engines extensivly, although i left unity right before the 3.0 release (Which was a fantastic update that addressed many of the issues i had with unity). I quickly found UDK and have been using it since then. I am a programmer so most of my insigt is from an engineering standpoint.

    Before i continue, I would like to adress some of the points that have arisen about Udk. Although UDK comes with a UTDemo, it is certainly not capable of only FPS games, such a point is irrelavant, most engines are capable of any general genre.

    I also do not understand why some people are outraged that Unreal Engine does not have a built in UnrealScript IDE. Although it may help some people, it is largly unnecessary and their is many other issues with the engine that needs to be adressed first.(Not to mention it would not even be possible). Unity's scripting system is certainly incredibly intuitive for non-programmers and is very accesible, but one needs to remember that it is the exception, not the norm. Unrealscript has a much more traditional object-oriented system, and thus has a much higher barrier to entry for beginners. Although unity's built in IDE is great, it is severly limited (thank god for monodevelope). The extra complexity that comes with unrealscript requires more flexible external workflows. My general workflow allows me to go from writing the code, to testing it in game with the click of one button and about 20 seconds. certainly not as easy as Unity, but also not complely unfathomable. As a point of reference, my current project would not have been possible for me to program in unity since I come from a more traditional background and unitys scripting system is slightly too radical for me to handle.

    sorry for the rambling, I just hope i can get some objective replies that arnt too crazy. If I had to bet on the future success of the engines, id put my money on Unity due to its rapid growth and intuitive features. UDK is remaining rather stagnant and i worry that its becoming more archaic wih each passing day. Both engines are phenominal, its just depends on the workflow and the goals of the developer.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  29. janpec

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    I am wondering if Epic is going to update UDK with Unreal Engine 4 code and framework when it comes out. That would made huge difference on field i guess.
     
  30. koyima

    koyima

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    Nice try, shameless plug.
     
  31. Starsman Games

    Starsman Games

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    But why let that stop you from pouring gass all over it and lite up the matches!
     
  32. dogzerx2

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    hahaha! that's hilarious!

    The flaming skunk rocks! Actually his ways are so refined that what he said is rather reasonable! For example the built in IDE thing, I'm only complaining because I've got unity but it's not so bad, right?
     
  33. theflamingskunk

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    I do not know what that means, but I would assume nothing good and that you didn't read any of my post (Of course I could be wrong, just an assumption).

    By "These Threads" I meant vs threads. In cases such as this, nothing is ever better than the other, It just depends on the users style and what their project entails. I also tried to be as objective and purely analytical over emotional, So i wouldn't necessarily say I lit the matches so much as gave the matches to potential pyromaniacs. Perhaps I shouldn't have of bumped a moderately old thread, But I do believe that having a dialogue about different engines is important, meaningless bashing and warring etc... Not so much. This is the gossip section so mine as well Gossip!

    I do not know whether that was sarcasm or not. I completly understand why you think its is important to have an in editor IDE, especially since you do use Unity. I know when I first switched from Unity, I got supper pissed at how much of a pain it is in UDK compared to Unity. I just wanted to point out that their is alternatives to constantly having to restart the editor, and to be honest, their is so many other issues with UDK that even if it was possible, they should focus on more pressing matters before tackling an IDE.

    Im not trying to be hostile to anyone so sorry if I come off that way. (also regarding that I only have like 1 post, I didnt create the account just to post, It just hasnt been active for 2 years so I think they reset the count or something).
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  34. KHopcraft

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    I don't think that was his intention, as he makes points that are indeed quite valid.
     
  35. koyima

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    Anyone reading your post would have to click on the link to understand what you mean by: I wouldn't be able to make my game, right?

    And ressurecting a dead thread, especially on this subject is inflaming. You also covered your ass by saying you are a former Unity user and by giving some praises to Unity towards the end. So again: nice try, hope you got some clicks, not entering the flaming war again, since this is the purpose of these threads as you are fully aware of.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  36. dogzerx2

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    yeah. this is crazy! actually we're taking any reasonable argument in favor of UDK as a flaming troll rampage nowadays! what is happening to us??
     
  37. theflamingskunk

    theflamingskunk

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    I have removed the link. I put it their to give an example of why I prefer UDK scripting over Unity. It was also used to give myself credibility and to show related experience. A better place may have been in signature, although I figured it would not be appropriate their since it is not UDK related. It was also clearly labeled as a link to my project, and was not misleading. Going by your same philosophy, The link in your signature is accountable of the same offence.

    That may be so. However i saw that I had genuine and unique perspective on the matter that I was capable of contributing. 2 Weeks is fairly old, but i figured it was reasonable, and that Starting a new thread wasnt appropriate.

    I do not believe I was "Saving my ass" of anything. I was a former Unity user, it was what I first used to get started in Game Development. I also never gave praises to Unity, I was simply stating my analysis of the experiences i've had with them.

    I don't believe its even worth commenting on the rest.

    It is to be expected. Does get somewhat tiresome when others are unable to conduct themselves properly. I would also like to clarify that im trying to remain relatively neutral towards both Engines. I was just sharing experiences ive had with UDK. The UDK fits my style better, so I will naturally favor it slightly more, but that doesn't mean I will blindly defend it (Especially since their is many issues with it). Although I never understood why people will blindly defend legitimate issues with a software. Acknowledging these issue is what motivates them to be addressed.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2012
  38. Starsman Games

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    @theflamingskunk, do you realize you are already in the defensive flame argument loop?

    Arguments are never based off some one thinking they are wrong, everyone in any argument always thinks they are right. The only way to have a "sensible dialog" on any topic is to state your point once, and not attempting to clarify further unless you are inquired for more information.
     
  39. flim

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    Great, this is the first example I found about extend Actor class, because most tutorials are extend UTGame, I think I will try this later.

    After several days of reading the documents on UDN, and browsing the package with UnCodeX, I think extend existing class and override/add functions is good practice for enterprise development, I feel UDK is kind of enterprise system for game development, everyone has OOP concept could understood the underneath power. Calling this is mod really undermine the power of this system.

    I read an old post on UDK forum, you will see the difference of philosophy of each engine:
     
  40. macos

    macos

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    so i was reading this thread on epic forums and i thought maybe he is right,so did any one think of switching to UDK , i know most people here worries about the royalty payment ,but don't forget that after selling your big game and hit 50000$ profit ,you can license unreal engine and you don't have to pay royalty any more ,and it will cost cheap at the beginning, just 99$ for android ,ios and flash and no need to pay 10000$ for platforms and adds-on.
     
  41. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

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    Admin, please close .

    If you cant afford Unity Pro don't buy it . UDK is a development nightmare, it takes far more time to do anything , and unless your using all that power then its really pointless .
     
  42. DallonF

    DallonF

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    I've thought about switching on multiple occasions, but a few things always stop me - mostly UnrealScript.

    1. The compiling process for UnrealScript is slow and requires restarting the engine. It sounds nitpicky but for as much coding as I do, it's a dealbreaker.
    2. The base classes are poorly documented and it's difficult to get a feel for the workflow of programming in UnrealScript because most of the tutorials you can find on the Internet don't work in the latest version.
    3. The workflow is, as best as I can tell, based on modifying the basic FPS you start with into something that fits your needs. While you can, with enough work, convert it to any genre, I prefer the Unity method of just building up the gameplay that you need.
    4. The built-in GUI system is deprecated in favor of Scaleform, and as a low-budget developer I can't afford to use and learn Flash just to have a nice HUD.

    UDK4, on the other hand, is looking pretty slick and I'll definitely give it a try; from what I've seen, it totally eliminates concern #1; a new version is sure to have more accurate learning resources, so #2 should be OK; #4 I don't know yet and could be a deciding factor; and I could get used to #3.
    We'll see, though. There's a lot of nice things that keep me using Unity.
     
  43. nipoco

    nipoco

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    1. Your thread title is misleading. Because of one guy (which is known here for his moaning about Unity btw.) you assume that more people leaving Unity ?
    2. He is wrong with Unity's upgrade price, because UT changed that after that shitstorm.

    3. You still have to pay royalties even with a full licensed UE, which costs several hundred thousands of dollars.

    4. If you can't make a game with Unity, that looks good, you certainly won't make a good looking game in UDK
     
  44. macos

    macos

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    i don't know what is wrong with you man ,i just want people opinion on this ,unless you're an admin and work at unity and you are afraid people will leave unity after reading this thoughts.
     
  45. macos

    macos

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    I guess you're right ,and unity is really easy ,and the documentation is awesome.
     
  46. keithsoulasa

    keithsoulasa

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    Your trolling , no ones going to leave unity after reading this . Its really annoying to come on to a forum and basically tell everyone their wrong . If you want to use Udk, use Udk, if you want to use Torque , use Torque, if you want to use Game Salad , use game salad , if you want to code your own engine, do that .

    these threads are pointless though
     
  47. macos

    macos

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    what ever dude, gee!

    you seem have anger issues , i myself own 2 license ios+android basic ,so please just stop this ,nothing personal ,and why don't you make your own engine ,and leave people alone .
     
  48. MarigoldFleur

    MarigoldFleur

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    It's not trolling and kinda raises a lot of valid points, especially in regards to the license limitations. The fact that Unity3D does not offer things like render to texture support in 2012 is absolutely mind-boggling. There's a lot of limitations in the free version of Unity that just aren't there in things like UDK and that's pretty terrible.
     
  49. PolyVector

    PolyVector

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    @macos
    You mean the licenses they gave away recently, right? ;)

    I agree that these types of threads amount to pointless trolling... If you want to compare engines, fine... but there are better ways to go about it.
     
  50. macos

    macos

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    Great points.