Super Mario Sunshine

Discussion in 'Scripting' started by JakeMorris0173, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. JakeMorris0173

    JakeMorris0173

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    Hello i'm wondering how to replicate the "goop" from Super Mario Sunshine could anyone give me any tips or hints please ?
     

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  2. rik338

    rik338

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    Super copyright sunshine!
     
  3. JakeMorris0173

    JakeMorris0173

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    could you elaborate more please ?
     
  4. rik338

    rik338

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    Email nintendo for the rights.
     
  5. tatelax

    tatelax

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    I think he is just asking how to replicate this effect.

    @Jake Never played the game, but maybe you could use a particle effect.
     
  6. JakeMorris0173

    JakeMorris0173

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    to be honest it looks more like an animated texture but i don't know how to go about doing that
     
  7. tatelax

    tatelax

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    Then you would just need to change the offset of the texture.
     
  8. JakeMorris0173

    JakeMorris0173

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    Okay, erm if i wanted to do the effect when the water touches the texture it dissolves how would i do that ?
     
  9. tatelax

    tatelax

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    You could make a mesh of the goop, then apply a good shader to that. Put a texture on the mesh of that along with a script that changes the offset of the texture. Then at the bottom of the mesh you could make a particle effect.

    Or if you want to make it looks very realistic you could use MegaFiers. http://www.west-racing.com/mf/
     
  10. JakeMorris0173

    JakeMorris0173

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  11. renman3000

    renman3000

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    I would think, that any fluid would be a number of spheres that ave an affinity for each other, in that they can move about but tend to gravitate to wards each other.
     
  12. artician

    artician

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    Sunshine used a combination of particles/decals and mesh effects that were blended together with a clever shader. Most of what you see in Sunshine are particle effects and/or dynamic decals (for simplicity I'll just call both 'particles'). Any time multiple particles share the same space, the shader they have blends them together to look like one large mass.
    The blending can be achieved by using a shader that is relative to the world, rather than object-relative (regular looking texture mapping) or camera-relative (think environment maps).
    Whenever you see the liquid in Sunshine move around, such as when an enemy comes up from beneath and breaks through, it's done by using a regular animated mesh that uses the same shader as the particles so it blends in with its neighbors as well.

    You would not want to use what those other developers are referring to as a "transition shader". What it looks like they are using are two different materials applied to a single surface or object. Then when another predefined object (such as the characters in their demo) come into contact with the surface, it causes the secondary material to appear over the primary material where ever the character came into contact with it. They might use some decal tech as well, but regardless it would not be dynamic enough to achieve the effect you're looking for.