Unity Community


Results 1 to 7 of 7

  1. Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,096

    What is a normal Field of View?

    I know the Unity editor defaults to 60 degrees for a new camera. Is this considered normal/standard/average?

    I'm working on a game where it's basically a side-view 2D-ish thing, side-scrolling mostly not much zooming or Z motion going on but I want it to have perspective on the 3D objects. I've already read quite a bit about how the wrong field of view can contribute a lot to motion sickness. What is a good FOV to use to avoid that? Higher or lower than 60? Should I go up to 80 or something?
    - ImaginaryHuman -

    NEW Mouse Path Animator - Mouse movement recording/playback - only $15!
    NEW Animated Dissolves for Shader Forge - Starting at $10!
    NEW Refract2D - Realtime refractions, reflections, image-based lighting, image distortions - ON SALE $25!
    Also Gradient Shader Pack - Realtime-generated animatable gradients - $20.
    Also Shader Wizard - CG Shader Generator including photoshop-style multi-texturing - $20.
    Also Texture Helper - procedural texture/pixmap-handling scripts - $10.


  2. Location
    Norway
    Posts
    152
    It really depends, you can get away with anything from 45 to 105 depending on the game. I don't have much experience with FOV in 2d style games, but I would just start the game and fiddle with the FOV value on the camera while playing and try to find something that looks good for your game.


  3. Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,096
    So is 60 considered some kind of normal for not making things look too distorted or too zoomed?
    - ImaginaryHuman -

    NEW Mouse Path Animator - Mouse movement recording/playback - only $15!
    NEW Animated Dissolves for Shader Forge - Starting at $10!
    NEW Refract2D - Realtime refractions, reflections, image-based lighting, image distortions - ON SALE $25!
    Also Gradient Shader Pack - Realtime-generated animatable gradients - $20.
    Also Shader Wizard - CG Shader Generator including photoshop-style multi-texturing - $20.
    Also Texture Helper - procedural texture/pixmap-handling scripts - $10.


  4. Location
    Brazil
    Posts
    86
    As far as I know, 60 degrees on field of view equates what the human eye perceives of the real world.
    So, I guess you are right.
    Portfolio: anselmo.gd | Blog: blog.anselmo.gd

    Developed the game Grasp!
    have fun!


  5. Location
    Norway
    Posts
    152
    Actually humans have a field of view of almost 180 degrees, with clear vision in about 120 degrees, at least according to wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_of_view

    This is however unsuitable for games on a normal screen, as the screen doesn't occupy your complete field of view (if you were displaying on VR glasses or IMAX cinema or something like that, it would be a different case).

    So the size of the screen you are displaying on matters. A bigger screen will occupy more of the human field of view. Also how close you are to the screen plays a role, again being closer means the screen is occupying more of the natural field of view.

    But this is largely irrelevant. You really need to play around with it to get a feel for it, and see what fits the style of your content. Pay attention to the edges of the display as you move and rotate the camera.

    Driving games, for example, will look better with a different FOV than FPS games. FOV can also be used for zoom effects, like when aiming in a FPS.

    So there's nothing really special with 60 as default, it's just a reasonable default value.


  6. Posts
    46
    In fact, most games that i've played had 75 FOV.

    The default for games, as far as i know, is something between 60 and 90, some games allow the player to choose the fov, First person ones generally has a larger FOV. The best fov imho, is something like 90 or even wider and some borders effects, like blur (gaussian on radial area), vignetting, in order to reproduce better the human vision, it's a personal preference though, i simply hate the lack of peripheral perception.
    The best solution would be to let the user chose the fov. However, note that the wider the fov, the higher video requirements are (mostly because of occlusion).


  7. Posts
    111
    I'd say 100 is fair if you're going to have a side-scroller.

    And yes, the FOV can contribute not only to motion-sickness, but to the overall feeling of the game. For instance, I couldn't play Metro 2033 because the FOV was way too small. Or maybe it was just me. :P

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •